2021 Beesball

clapper

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I thought that the MLBPA had bands of salary/bonuses by draft slot or something?
"In the first 10 rounds of the MLB draft, each pick is assigned a certain amount of guaranteed bonus money that teams are allowed to spend on signing a player without facing a penalty.

Teams can opt to spend more or less than the allotted slot value, but may incur a penalty if they exceed the amount — or risk losing a player if it's not the money they were looking for."
 

coit

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"In the first 10 rounds of the MLB draft, each pick is assigned a certain amount of guaranteed bonus money that teams are allowed to spend on signing a player without facing a penalty.

Teams can opt to spend more or less than the allotted slot value, but may incur a penalty if they exceed the amount — or risk losing a player if it's not the money they were looking for."
So they lose their high first round pick and screw the kid over for a year, after which he has to go thru the draft again. The team gets a compensatory pick the next year, kid gets nothing.
 

LambdaChiGT

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From d1Baseball (he's the 16th of 18 coaches named):
Assistants Most Ready For Head Coaching Jobs

James Ramsey, Georgia Tech
Ramsey had an infectious personality and was a big-time player during his time at Florida State. Those traits have continued thus far as an assistant coach with the Yellow Jackets. Ramsey has spent three seasons with the Jackets and has made an impact as the hitting coach and on the recruiting trail. Ramsey’s name came up with a couple of athletic directors this summer, and his stock will continue to rise.
 

Beej1953

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So they lose their high first round pick and screw the kid over for a year, after which he has to go thru the draft again. The team gets a compensatory pick the next year, kid gets nothing.
Saw an article saying Rocker’s agent (Scott Boras) said Rocker’s not going back to Vandy and is looking forward to continuing his professional career - maybe sign with one of the independent minor league teams? Not sure if that makes him a free agent, or whether he goes back in the draft next year.
 

BrentwoodJacket

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Saw an article saying Rocker’s agent (Scott Boras) said Rocker’s not going back to Vandy and is looking forward to continuing his professional career - maybe sign with one of the independent minor league teams? Not sure if that makes him a free agent, or whether he goes back in the draft next year.
This seems like a risky path for a pitcher.
 

LambdaChiGT

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d1baseball writeups from a review of Cape Cod prospects (by team)

Zach Maxwell, RHP, Georgia Tech
A pure power pitcher with an enormous 6-foot-7, 275-pound physique, Maxwell was a strikeout machine as a 2YR FR at Georgia Tech this spring, fanning 56 in 32 innings — but also walking 41. He continued to miss a ton of bats this summer (25 K in 11.2 IP), and while his walk rate remained high, at least it dipped below a walk per inning. We’ve seen him up to 99 mph in the past, and he worked at 95-98 this summer, with good riding life up in the zone. He also featured a hammer curveball at 83-85 mph with hard downer action and spin rates in the 2600-2700 rpm range. With a high release and steep, downhill plane, Maxwell strikes an intimidating look for opposing hitters. He can struggle at times finding the zone, and he offers an unusual combination of being surprisingly hittable thanks to loose command, but also the ability to miss bats by the boatload. When he executes, he is simply overpowering. When his release is off, his breaking ball can hang and his fastball catches too much white. Maxwell has a pure reliever profile, and Holliday thinks he can be a major league closer in the Jonathan Broxton mold. He also stands out for his makeup, and he emerged as the leader of the pitching staff from the start of the summer to the finish.

Kevin Parada, C, Georgia Tech
Parada played just nine games for Chatham before heading to Team USA and then shutting it down for the summer. He was worn down after serving as Georgia Tech’s everyday catcher all spring, and he did not show great receiving or throwing skills for Chatham. He’ll need to clean those things up, but his bat is his calling card, and he can really hit. Here’s David Seifert’s report on Parada after seeing him with Team USA: At the plate, the righthanded hitter stayed inside the ball well and showed power to all fields. He has the potential to hit for a high average and above average power and finished second on the CNT in batting average at .400 (10-for-25). Behind the plate, he is limited defensively with fair hands, fringe arm strength and his one-knee setup may be more comfortable, but isn’t conducive for high-level blocking. However, with an exceptional work ethic, anything is possible and Parada could continue to grind it out behind the plate. Otherwise, a move to first base is likely in his future at the next level. Based on his bat alone, Parada is likely to receive Day One consideration in 2022.

Others noted:
Georgia Tech outfielder Jake DeLeo stands out for his quick-twitch athleticism and his easy plus speed. He played outstanding defense in center field for Chatham, getting good jumps, taking good routes and showing a very playable arm. His skill set now is best suited to make him a line-drive-hitting table setter, and he gets into trouble when he sells out for power, which hasn’t yet materialized for him (he hit .234 with one homer and three doubles in 11 at-bats this summer, but he stole seven bases). More work in the weight room should allow him to drive the ball with more authority in time

Tres Gonzalez (Georgia Tech) started slow (.200 batting average over his first nine games), but finished sizzlin’ hot for a .331 season average which was good for second in the league. ...
... A late surge by outfielder Tres Gonzalez (Georgia Tech) propelled him to a runner-up finish for the 2021 Cape batting title. The left handed hitter finished at .331, boosting his average 45 points in the last seven games. There’s not a whole lot of power for the 6-foot, 180-pound corner outfield with just six XBH (all doubles) in 121 at-bats, but he has a compact, line drive stroke with some whip to its finish, very good bat-to-ball skills and strong plate discipline with more walks (17) than strikeouts (15).
 
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GTCrew4b

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d1baseball writeups from a review of Cape Cop prospects (by team)

Zach Maxwell, RHP, Georgia Tech
A pure power pitcher with an enormous 6-foot-7, 275-pound physique, Maxwell was a strikeout machine as a 2YR FR at Georgia Tech this spring, fanning 56 in 32 innings — but also walking 41. He continued to miss a ton of bats this summer (25 K in 11.2 IP), and while his walk rate remained high, at least it dipped below a walk per inning. We’ve seen him up to 99 mph in the past, and he worked at 95-98 this summer, with good riding life up in the zone. He also featured a hammer curveball at 83-85 mph with hard downer action and spin rates in the 2600-2700 rpm range. With a high release and steep, downhill plane, Maxwell strikes an intimidating look for opposing hitters. He can struggle at times finding the zone, and he offers an unusual combination of being surprisingly hittable thanks to loose command, but also the ability to miss bats by the boatload. When he executes, he is simply overpowering. When his release is off, his breaking ball can hang and his fastball catches too much white. Maxwell has a pure reliever profile, and Holliday thinks he can be a major league closer in the Jonathan Broxton mold. He also stands out for his makeup, and he emerged as the leader of the pitching staff from the start of the summer to the finish.

Kevin Parada, C, Georgia Tech
Parada played just nine games for Chatham before heading to Team USA and then shutting it down for the summer. He was worn down after serving as Georgia Tech’s everyday catcher all spring, and he did not show great receiving or throwing skills for Chatham. He’ll need to clean those things up, but his bat is his calling card, and he can really hit. Here’s David Seifert’s report on Parada after seeing him with Team USA: At the plate, the righthanded hitter stayed inside the ball well and showed power to all fields. He has the potential to hit for a high average and above average power and finished second on the CNT in batting average at .400 (10-for-25). Behind the plate, he is limited defensively with fair hands, fringe arm strength and his one-knee setup may be more comfortable, but isn’t conducive for high-level blocking. However, with an exceptional work ethic, anything is possible and Parada could continue to grind it out behind the plate. Otherwise, a move to first base is likely in his future at the next level. Based on his bat alone, Parada is likely to receive Day One consideration in 2022.

Others noted:
Georgia Tech outfielder Jake DeLeo stands out for his quick-twitch athleticism and his easy plus speed. He played outstanding defense in center field for Chatham, getting good jumps, taking good routes and showing a very playable arm. His skill set now is best suited to make him a line-drive-hitting table setter, and he gets into trouble when he sells out for power, which hasn’t yet materialized for him (he hit .234 with one homer and three doubles in 11 at-bats this summer, but he stole seven bases). More work in the weight room should allow him to drive the ball with more authority in time

Tres Gonzalez (Georgia Tech) started slow (.200 batting average over his first nine games), but finished sizzlin’ hot for a .331 season average which was good for second in the league. ...
... A late surge by outfielder Tres Gonzalez (Georgia Tech) propelled him to a runner-up finish for the 2021 Cape batting title. The left handed hitter finished at .331, boosting his average 45 points in the last seven games. There’s not a whole lot of power for the 6-foot, 180-pound corner outfield with just six XBH (all doubles) in 121 at-bats, but he has a compact, line drive stroke with some whip to its finish, very good bat-to-ball skills and strong plate discipline with more walks (17) than strikeouts (15).
Cape Cop? And you try to pas yourself off as some kinda expert? GTFOutta here!
 

LambdaChiGT

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Writeup about incoming transfer (from UAB) Chandler Simpson, who is playing in the Northwoods League this summer.

If there’s a better double-play tandem in the Northwoods League than the Fond du Lac Dock Spiders’, I’d very much like to see it.

It starts with Chandler Simpson, who’s second in the league in batting with a .377 average (though play on Aug. 1) thanks to a slashing, line drive approach from the lefthanded batter’s box. He has incredible bat-to-ball skills and rarely strikes out, drawing 19 walks and fanning only 10 times in 204 at-bats so far this summer. In this look he led off the game with a base hit back up the middle and added a double sliced to left field that he turned into a double, advancing to third on the throw. He then scored easily on a tapper out front. Somewhat of an old-school throwback, he’s a similar player in terms of game disruption as Vanderbilt outfielder Enrique Bradfield, and Simpson also leads the NWL in stolen bases with 55 in 65 attempts. At 6-foot-2, 180-pounds, he has a unique broad-shouldered, high-waisted build but there isn’t much muscle mass. There also isn’t much power to his swing and overall approach, which may not matter much given how well he impacts the game at the top of a batting order with his talents.

Defensively Simpson made a few strong plays at second base including one where he scooped a hot shop chopper, fired and threw out the runner with little time to spare. After spending his first two seasons at UAB, Simpson is transferring to Georgia Tech for his third-year sophomore season and could be a dangerous addition atop the Jackets’ lineup.
 

1990wspjacket

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Writeup about incoming transfer (from UAB) Chandler Simpson, who is playing in the Northwoods League this summer.

If there’s a better double-play tandem in the Northwoods League than the Fond du Lac Dock Spiders’, I’d very much like to see it.

It starts with Chandler Simpson, who’s second in the league in batting with a .377 average (though play on Aug. 1) thanks to a slashing, line drive approach from the lefthanded batter’s box. He has incredible bat-to-ball skills and rarely strikes out, drawing 19 walks and fanning only 10 times in 204 at-bats so far this summer. In this look he led off the game with a base hit back up the middle and added a double sliced to left field that he turned into a double, advancing to third on the throw. He then scored easily on a tapper out front. Somewhat of an old-school throwback, he’s a similar player in terms of game disruption as Vanderbilt outfielder Enrique Bradfield, and Simpson also leads the NWL in stolen bases with 55 in 65 attempts. At 6-foot-2, 180-pounds, he has a unique broad-shouldered, high-waisted build but there isn’t much muscle mass. There also isn’t much power to his swing and overall approach, which may not matter much given how well he impacts the game at the top of a batting order with his talents.

Defensively Simpson made a few strong plays at second base including one where he scooped a hot shop chopper, fired and threw out the runner with little time to spare. After spending his first two seasons at UAB, Simpson is transferring to Georgia Tech for his third-year sophomore season and could be a dangerous addition atop the Jackets’ lineup.
Hey Lambda, just wanted to say thanks for all of your GT baseball insight..... You go above and beyond, always staying on top of recruiting. Keep up the good work!
 
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