Marylin Monroe on the cover of Look

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perplexity.ai:

"Why did Marilyn Monroe pose in a Tech sweater on the cover of Look magazine?"

Marilyn Monroe posed in a Georgia Tech cheerleader's sweater for the cover of Look magazine in 1952 as part of a photo shoot that showcased her versatility and appeal.The photo session, conducted by photographer Bob Sandberg, included various glamour portraits of Monroe taken at Niagara Falls, where she was on location filming the movie "Niagara". Among these shots, Monroe was photographed wearing a Georgia Tech cheerleader's sweater and holding a pennant.This particular image was chosen for the cover of Look magazine's September 9, 1952 issue. The decision to feature Monroe in college attire likely aimed to capitalize on her rising stardom while presenting her in a relatable, all-American context. By donning a university sweater, Monroe could appeal to a broader audience, including young adults and college students.The Georgia Tech-themed photo was not just used for the cover; it was also published inside the magazine as part of an article titled "Yea, Georgia Tech!". This suggests that the photo shoot may have been part of a larger feature or promotional effort involving the university.It's worth noting that such cross-promotional activities were common in Hollywood during this era, as studios and magazines often collaborated to boost the visibility of rising stars. For Monroe, who was rapidly becoming one of the most recognizable faces in America, posing in a variety of outfits and settings helped to showcase her versatility and broaden her appeal to different demographics.

"Why Georgia Tech?"

The choice of Georgia Tech for Marilyn Monroe's photo shoot was likely influenced by several factors:
  • National Championship: Georgia Tech had won the national championship in football in 1952, the same year the photo was taken. This recent success may have made the university a topical and appealing choice for a magazine cover
  • Timing and Relevance: The photo was used for the September 9, 1952 issue of Look magazine, coinciding with the start of the college football season. Georgia Tech's recent success made them a relevant and recognizable team for a national audience
  • Visual Appeal: The yellow and white colors of Georgia Tech's cheerleader sweater may have been chosen for their visual impact on the magazine cover, complementing Monroe's blonde hair and creating an eye-catching image.
  • Broad Appeal: By choosing a well-known university with a successful sports program, the magazine could appeal to a wide audience, including college students, sports fans, and Monroe's admirers.
  • Possible Connection: There might have been a connection between someone involved in the photo shoot (photographer, magazine staff, or Monroe's team) and Georgia Tech, though this is speculative without further evidence.
  • Promotional Opportunity: The choice may have been part of a broader promotional effort involving Georgia Tech, as evidenced by the article titled "Yea, Georgia Tech!" that accompanied the photo inside the magazine
It's worth noting that the specific reasoning behind choosing Georgia Tech over other universities is not explicitly stated in the available search results. The decision was likely a combination of the factors mentioned above, with the university's recent national championship success being a significant consideration.
 
Here you go.
 

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perplexity.ai:

"Why did Marilyn Monroe pose in a Tech sweater on the cover of Look magazine?"

Marilyn Monroe posed in a Georgia Tech cheerleader's sweater for the cover of Look magazine in 1952 as part of a photo shoot that showcased her versatility and appeal.The photo session, conducted by photographer Bob Sandberg, included various glamour portraits of Monroe taken at Niagara Falls, where she was on location filming the movie "Niagara". Among these shots, Monroe was photographed wearing a Georgia Tech cheerleader's sweater and holding a pennant.This particular image was chosen for the cover of Look magazine's September 9, 1952 issue. The decision to feature Monroe in college attire likely aimed to capitalize on her rising stardom while presenting her in a relatable, all-American context. By donning a university sweater, Monroe could appeal to a broader audience, including young adults and college students.The Georgia Tech-themed photo was not just used for the cover; it was also published inside the magazine as part of an article titled "Yea, Georgia Tech!". This suggests that the photo shoot may have been part of a larger feature or promotional effort involving the university.It's worth noting that such cross-promotional activities were common in Hollywood during this era, as studios and magazines often collaborated to boost the visibility of rising stars. For Monroe, who was rapidly becoming one of the most recognizable faces in America, posing in a variety of outfits and settings helped to showcase her versatility and broaden her appeal to different demographics.

"Why Georgia Tech?"

The choice of Georgia Tech for Marilyn Monroe's photo shoot was likely influenced by several factors:
  • National Championship: Georgia Tech had won the national championship in football in 1952, the same year the photo was taken. This recent success may have made the university a topical and appealing choice for a magazine cover
  • Timing and Relevance: The photo was used for the September 9, 1952 issue of Look magazine, coinciding with the start of the college football season. Georgia Tech's recent success made them a relevant and recognizable team for a national audience
  • Visual Appeal: The yellow and white colors of Georgia Tech's cheerleader sweater may have been chosen for their visual impact on the magazine cover, complementing Monroe's blonde hair and creating an eye-catching image.
  • Broad Appeal: By choosing a well-known university with a successful sports program, the magazine could appeal to a wide audience, including college students, sports fans, and Monroe's admirers.
  • Possible Connection: There might have been a connection between someone involved in the photo shoot (photographer, magazine staff, or Monroe's team) and Georgia Tech, though this is speculative without further evidence.
  • Promotional Opportunity: The choice may have been part of a broader promotional effort involving Georgia Tech, as evidenced by the article titled "Yea, Georgia Tech!" that accompanied the photo inside the magazine
It's worth noting that the specific reasoning behind choosing Georgia Tech over other universities is not explicitly stated in the available search results. The decision was likely a combination of the factors mentioned above, with the university's recent national championship success being a significant consideration.
GT SID Ned "Bevo" West knew EVERYBODY. I mean EVERYBODY. That was no small part of it.

That's why Ann-Margaret had a photo shoot with Brent Cunningham, Rock Perdoni, Bubba Hoats, & Smylie Gebhart et al when she was in Atlanta promoting a less-than-memorable flick (link) with Joe Namath.

And that's why our 1969 USC trip had us meeting Raquel Welch.

Bevo knew EVERYBODY.
 
I never knew what the song C.C. Rider was about. Now I do.

I Can't Turn You Loose is a great song, too. Hell of a soundtrack for a movie I've never heard of.
 
I never knew what the song C.C. Rider was about. Now I do.

I Can't Turn You Loose is a great song, too. Hell of a soundtrack for a movie I've never heard of.
I wanna be your Driver - Chuck Berry
 
I wanna be your Driver - Chuck Berry
Yeah, upon further research, CC Rider the song predates that movie by decades, at least. So I guess the movie was based on the song? Looks like I Can't Turn You Loose predated the movie, too.

I feel better now that I don't know the movie.
 
perplexity.ai:
Broad Appeal: By choosing a well-known university with a successful sports program, the magazine could appeal to a wide audience, including college students, sports fans, and Monroe's admirers.
No doubt that broad had appeal, think that should be higher on the list.
 
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